Today's Dental News

Is a Visual Illusion Making You Over-Drill?

It’s possible that you are drilling larger holes in your patients’ teeth than you need to.

A new study done in New Zealand and published in the journal PLOS One suggests that dentists may fall victim to a visual illusion that could affect treatment. The optical illusion, called the Delboeuf Illusion, refers to a situation in which two circles are placed one inside of the other. Depending on the size of the outer circle, the contained circle could appear either larger or smaller than it actually is. If the surrounding circle is much larger, similar to what is seen with holes in teeth, it can make the inner circle look smaller.

Read more: Is a Visual Illusion Making You Over-Drill?

 

More Dental Patients Visiting General Practitioners

People with dental problems aren’t necessarily going to the dentist as much as they did in the past.

A recent study shows that general practitioners are seeing patients with dental issues on an increasing basis in the United Kingdom. According to a recent survey, 87 percent of general practitioners feel under pressure to deal with dental health problems, such as toothaches or mouth ulcers.

Read more: More Dental Patients Visiting General Practitioners

   

Treaty Will Ensure Continued Use of Amalgam

Dental amalgam won’t be going anywhere in the near future.

A US-signed treaty in regards to mercury recently was enacted, which will enable amalgam to continue to be used the way it has been in the dental profession. A Department of State official signed the Minamata Convention on Mercury on Nov. 6, allowing the United States to become a party to the convention. The document was originally scheduled to be signed on Oct. 10 in Japan but the US could not sign it at that point because of the government shutdown.

Ratification is subject to Senate approval.

Read more: Treaty Will Ensure Continued Use of Amalgam

   

Brushing Teeth Could Stop Heart Attacks, Strokes

A new study proves that regular brushing could thwart a heart attack or stroke.

Researchers from the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University determined that brushing on a regular basis could eliminate atherosclerosis, which is a buildup of fatty deposits in the arteries. Atherosclerosis is one of the major risk factors for heart attacks and strokes based on the fatty deposits blocking the flow of blood to the heart and brain.

Read more: Brushing Teeth Could Stop Heart Attacks, Strokes

   

Drug Could be Utilized to Treat Periodontitis, Chronic Diseases

A drug used to treat intestinal worms may have a new purpose.

Recent studies have shown that Oxantel could protect people from periodontitis. The information appears in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

The current treatment for periodontitis can be costly and it isn’t necessarily full proof. Oxantel was shown to prevent growth by blocking an enzyme that bacteria need to create the biofilm associated with periodontitis.

Read more: Drug Could be Utilized to Treat Periodontitis, Chronic Diseases

   

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