Today's Dental News

Dentists in England Set to be Paid per Head

Dentists in England will be paid according to the number of people they treat, rather than the courses of treatment they provide, under new plans to reform the dentistry contract.

The move follows the government’s intention, set out in the Coalition Agreement, to introduce a new dental contract in a bid to shift practice away from “drill and fill” payments to incentivizing preventive treatment and quality care.

The previous reform of the dental contract in 2006 was widely criticized for rewarding dentists on activity against set targets. A House of Commons Health Select Committee concluded in 2008 that the new contract had not solved access problems nor improved quality, and that the payment system was extremely unpopular with dentists.

Read more: Dentists in England Set to be Paid per Head

 

Sugars, Acids in Alcohol May Lead to Tooth Decay

We all know that anything in excess is not good for us. That includes, food, drugs, alcohol, and the list is infinite.

It is a fact, however, that alcohol consumption, especially in larger amounts, not only affects our overall health but our oral health as well.

Dentists often are the first healthcare professionals to detect the abuses caused by alcohol and drug consumption.

Alcohol addiction can change the priorities in one’s life. Often alcoholics spend more time caring for their addiction than they do about their health, especially the health of their teeth and mouth.

Read more: Sugars, Acids in Alcohol May Lead to Tooth Decay

   

University Of Maryland Dental School Stepping Up Ergonomics Instruction

In response to a high prevalence of neck and back pain among working dentists and dental hygienists, the dean of the University of Maryland Dental School Christian S. Stohler, DMD, DrMedDent, has launched an initiative to bring renewed attention to ergonomics into dental education.

Starting with the current semester, every incoming student must take the School’s course “Ergonomics in Dentistry,” before he or she can practice simulations or live-patient dental work. The school wants to be the place where dentists and dental hygienists learn to practice ergonomically correct practices, says Stohler.

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Americans Heading Overseas for Dental Treatment

The rising cost of dental treatment in America is forcing an increasingly large number of Americans to consider having treatment abroad.

Dental treatment is becoming more expensive in the United States and many people cannot afford basic treatments, let alone costly cosmetic treatments. Even those with dental insurance are struggling to cope with the cost of dental treatment and many are now taking the plunge and heading overseas for dental treatment.


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Osteoporosis Drug Reduces Bone Loss, Tumor Size in Oral Cancer

A drug currently approved for osteoporosis treatment has been shown to reduce bone loss in a study of mice with oral cancer, suggesting it could serve as an important supplemental therapy in patients with head and neck cancers that erode bone.

In this Ohio State University study, the drug treatment also was associated with smaller tumors—an unexpected result.

The drug, zoledronic acid, is known by the brand name Zometa. It is designed to inhibit bone resorption, which is the breaking down of bone caused by the release of a specific kind of cell.

Read more: Osteoporosis Drug Reduces Bone Loss, Tumor Size in Oral Cancer

   

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