Today's Dental News

Computerized Tomography Scanning Offers New Uses in Oral Surgery Recovery

Computerized tomography (CT) has proved a useful tool in reconstructive dental implant surgery in which a bone graft is required. It provides reliable information in diagnosis and treatment planning and has been used to determine the volume of bone for grafts. Now dentistry is finding postsurgical uses for CT as well.

An article in the current issue of the Journal of Oral Implantology relates two case studies in which CT played an essential role. Both cases used CT scanning before and up to one year after the patients’ oral surgery. With this technology, oral surgeons were able to gauge the healing process following surgery that reconstructs the jaw and prepares it for future implants.

Read more: Computerized Tomography Scanning Offers New Uses in Oral Surgery Recovery

 

Physicians Take Aim at Curbing Tooth Decay in Preschoolers

A new study by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill shows that a preventive program administered to children under age 4 can limit the need for treatment involving tooth decay.

The program, called “Into the Mouths of Babes,” trains doctors and nurses not in the dental profession, while giving them the ability check for dental caries and other issues. The program was created in 2000 by North Carolina Medicaid as a way of being proactive in curbing childhood tooth decay rates.

Read more: Physicians Take Aim at Curbing Tooth Decay in Preschoolers

   

Arkansas Legislature Forces State to Continue Fluoride Usage

Arkansas legislators are not listening to recent studies on fluoride usage.

They’re mandating all cities and communities in the state with more than 5,000 people to fluoridate all water supplies.

The Arkansas state senate passed a bill, 25-7, that would force cities and towns to fluoridate water. The bill, which has been spearheaded by Sen. David Johnson (D-Little Rock), will impact the town of Fort Smith the most. It is the largest city in the state that currently does not use fluoride in water.

Read more: Arkansas Legislature Forces State to Continue Fluoride Usage

   

New Research Adds Insight to Childhood Caries

A new discovery has been made regarding childhood dental disease, according to The Forsyth Institute.

Dr. Anne Tanner conducted a study that pinpointed a new pathogen that appears to have a connection with severe early childhood caries. There was a certain bacterium, Scardovia wiggsiae, that was found in the mouths of children who were suffering from severe caries problems. Other known pathogens like Streptococcus mutans did not appear in their mouths.

It’s conceivable that this finding may prevent this disease.

Read more: New Research Adds Insight to Childhood Caries

   

Number of Throat Cancer Cases Rising because of Increase in Oral Sex

The Human Papillomavirus is becoming more widespread because it is transmitted through oral sex. It is developing into a greater cause of throat cancer than some forms of tobacco.

According to an Ohio State University study, researchers found that there was a 225-percent increase in oral cancer cases from 1974 through 2007, mostly involving men.

The chances of developing oral cancer increase, depending on the number of people the person has performed oral sex on.

The research also shows that 64 percent of oral cancer cases in the United States show evidence of HPV infection. There are also a higher number of these cases among younger people.

Read more: Number of Throat Cancer Cases Rising because of Increase in Oral Sex

   

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