Today's Dental News

Canadian Dental Surgeon Heads to Afghanistan to Mentor Troops

A Canadian dental surgeon recently decided there was more for him to do than be a dentist.

So instead of maintaining his practice and making the money he was on course to make, he opted to head to the Kandahari desert to mentor Afghan troops in counter-insurgency tactics.

“Most people find it hard to relate to,” Capt. Luong Phuc Nguyen told the Vancouver Sun. “I am losing a lot of money and not furthering my career.”

Nguyen, whose parents are from Vietnam, chose to mentor the Afghan troops. But he’s not simply a military dentist or dental surgeon behind the scenes. He’s a qualified infantry officer and will be at a Forward Operating Base with combat troops. That means he’s not behind the scenes, which is something he did during a tour in 2007-2008.

Read more: Canadian Dental Surgeon Heads to Afghanistan to Mentor Troops

 

Poodle to Undergo Dental Surgery

A poodle in the Canadian province of British Columbia is named “Miracle May” for a reason.

The dog was dropped by a bird of prey onto the grounds of a nursing home in British Columbia. The dog will now undergo dental surgery.

Nurses found the dog on May 2 after the dog fell from the sky and landed on the grounds of the nursing home. The dog had gouges in its neck, claw marks on the back, and broken ribs, in addition to needing dental surgery for severely decayed teeth.

Read more: Poodle to Undergo Dental Surgery

   

Researchers Pinpoint Cavity-Causing Bacterium

Researchers believe they have identified bacteria that cause early childhood caries.

A team of scientists from Boston agreed with previous information stating that Streptococcus mutans is a main cause of early childhood caries. The team, however, discovered a new bacterium, Scardovia wiggsiae. The researchers believe this bacterium is also a major factor in caries development.

The findings appear in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.

Read more: Researchers Pinpoint Cavity-Causing Bacterium

   

Researchers Look for Solution for Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients

There may be a solution for preventing xerostomia.

Xerostomia, which is a dry mouth from a lack of saliva, often impacts patients with throat or mouth cancer. A new study indicates that submandibular gland transfer may stop xerostomia, which often is a side effect from radiation.

Xerostomia is a problem because it develops when the salivary glands stop working. University of Alberta researcher Jana Rieger compared xerostomia to what it feels like after undergoing surgery and the anesthesia. The problem with xerostomia is that it’s permanent.

Read more: Researchers Look for Solution for Dry Mouth in Cancer Patients

   

Possible Breakthrough in Tooth Decay Research

Information from a facility that works with electrons could lead to the eventual prevention of tooth decay.

At Diamond Light Source in Oxfordshire England, a 3-D structure allowed the researchers to find an important enzyme involved with tooth decay. Diamond Light Source is a research center that accelerates electrons to close to the speed of light.

The enzyme discovered forms glucan, which is a substance that contains bacteria that forms on the surface of teeth. When the bacterium eventually forms, it secretes an acid that destroys the enamel of the teeth.

Read more: Possible Breakthrough in Tooth Decay Research

   

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