Today's Dental News

Programs Attempt to Halt Tooth Decay in Children

A new program will try to stop tooth decay by adding a new layer to monitoring a child’s health. Programs to implement tooth decay prevention in a child’s visit to the doctor could be vital toward a child’s oral health.

University of Florida researchers will analyze the results in Florida and Texas among children enrolled in Medicaid. The researchers are buoyed by an almost $300,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health.

The recommended age for a first dental visit is by the child’s first birthday, but there are many children who don’t receive proper dental care until they’re older.

Read more: Programs Attempt to Halt Tooth Decay in Children

 

New Methods Aid People with Sleep Apnea

New research suggests that sleep apnea patients saw their condition improve more with a mandibular advancement splint (MAS) and positive airway pressure (PAP) than with solely using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).

The information was presented at the 20th Anniversary Meeting of the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine in Minneapolis.

The results indicated that without lowering the pressure significantly, continuous positive airway pressure tolerance can be improved. It means that people with obstructive sleep apnea can receive a mandibular advancement splint, which enables the nasal pillows to stay in place.

Read more: New Methods Aid People with Sleep Apnea

   

Governor Ends Dental Care Dispute

The issues between the dental profession and a nonprofit company in Alabama will come to an end.

Alabama Governor Robert Bentley signed a bill Thursday that will end the dispute involving the issues the leaders of the dental profession in the state had with the treatment the nonprofit organization was giving to low-income patients.

The new law states that the nonprofit company, Sarrell Dental, can provide the dental care they were giving but the company will now be regulated by the state’s dental commission. Sarrell Dental Centers and the dental community were at odds over whether or not what Sarrell was doing was legal. Sarrell was providing low-cost dental treatment to patients but wasn’t subject to any official dental regulations, which cost dentists patients and could have resulted in injuries to the patients.

Sarrell Dental Centers will now drop a state antitrust lawsuit against the Alabama Dental Association, according to company CEO Jeffrey Parker.

Both sides got what they wanted, because Sarrell Dental will continue to operate the way it does, and the Alabama Dental Association can oversee Sarrell Dental’s procedures and the course of treatment it provides to its patients.

Read more: Governor Ends Dental Care Dispute

   

Xylitol Limits Amount of Cavities in Babies

Xylitol may be the key to reducing cavities in babies.

A new study indicates that mothers can stop cavities from forming in their child’s mouth by wiping Xylitol on the gums. Ling Zhan, assistant professor of dentistry at the University of San Francisco, mentioned this information at the International Association of Dental Research meeting.

The amount of cavities decreased even though there was no drop in cariogenic organisms, according to the study. This new information did not follow any other patterns that had previously been seen.

Read more: Xylitol Limits Amount of Cavities in Babies

   

Bill May Stop Dispute Involving Dentists, Nonprofit Groups

Alabama Governor Robert Bentley may soon end a dispute between dentists and nonprofit groups.

A bill waiting for Bentley to sign will require nonprofit groups that treat low-income dental patients to register with the Alabama Board of Dental Examiners. It also stipulates that the nonprofit groups would be allowed to perform dental treatment.

The dispute arose because the nonprofit corporation grew larger than ever could have been expected. One nonprofit group in particular, Sarrell Dental Centers, was at odds with the dental community. This group, which has 52 dentists, 11 clinics, and a mobile unit could as much as $15 million this year.

Read more: Bill May Stop Dispute Involving Dentists, Nonprofit Groups

   

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