Today's Dental News

Hops Could Fight Tooth Decay

One of the ingredients used to brew beer could possibly be used to do even better things.

The part of hops not used in making beer may have the right properties to thwart gum disease and decay. The study comes from the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

The research team determined the antioxidants in hops may have just the right stuff to lower the risk of gum disease and tooth decay. The American Chemical Society researchers pinpointed the hop leaves as the part that may be able to be used for this cause. The hop leaves are not used to make beer.

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Tooth Extractions Before Cardiac Surgery Don’t Fully Eliminate Problems

Having a tooth extracted before heart surgery doesn’t guarantee a positive outcome.

Mayo Clinic research indicates that about one of 10 cardiac surgery patients ended up having a stroke or kidney failure even after having a tooth pulled before the procedure. The information appears in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Prosthetic heart valve-caused endocarditis results in about 25 percent of infective endocarditis cases and is fatal for almost 40 percent of patients who develop it. That’s why physicians try to pinpoint any risk factors, such as poor dental health, prior to surgery. Extracting diseased teeth is common but there isn’t much research suggesting whether or not it truly helps.

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Bacteria-Causing Gum Disease May Lead to Oral Cancer Growth

Fatty acids from bacteria present in gum disease may cause Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS)-related lesions and tumors in the mouth.

The information comes from a study by Case Western Reserve University. The researchers analyzed how byproducts in the form of fatty acids cause the growth of the lesions.

This finding could result in early saliva testing for bacteria. The person could then possibly be treated for signs of cancer or cancer before it would become malignant.

The information appears in the Journal of Virology.

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Link May Exist Between Oral Health and Rheumatoid Arthritis

Poor oral health may cause rheumatoid arthritis, based on a new study.

Researchers from the University of Louisville determined that poor oral health can raise the risk of rheumatoid arthritis based on the presence of an enzyme that is around when a person has gum disease. This enzyme, called peptidylarginine deiminanse, has also been associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

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Tooth Decay May Prohibit Growth in Children

Tooth decay may be even worse than originally thought.

A new study suggests that tooth decay may push back growth in children. The study appeared in the online version of Pediatrics journal and was conducted at University College London and King Fahad Armed Forces Hospital in Saudi Arabia.

The research team wanted to explore the relationship between oral health and growth after previous studies failed to show definitive evidence one way or the other. In this study, the researchers looked at the dental decay and the correlation between height and weight in Saudi Arabian children ages 6 through 8.

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