Today's Dental News

Tulsa Dentist Causes Unique Outbreak

Never before had there been an outbreak of hepatitis C among dental patients. But that was prior to a Tulsa, Okla. dentist using rusty equipment and dirty needles in his practice.

Dr. W. Scott Harrington’s practice was shut down in March after a surprise inspection showed that there were major problems in his sterilization processes. Since then, at least 89 of his patients have tested positive for hepatitis C.

Harrington allegedly reused needles, something that can clearly contaminate drugs with disease-causing pathogens. He maintained a separate set of tools for patients that he knew carried an infectious disease, based on the information ascertained by the Oklahoma Board of Dentistry. The tools had clear signs of red-brown rust spots, showing that it wasn’t possible to properly sterilize them.

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Dental Visits Still Give Some People Bad Feelings

There’s almost nothing that can be done to stop some people from being disgusted by thoughts of visiting the dentist.

But people in the dental profession will still try. Recently the Adult Dental Health Survey, a study conducted by the British Dental Health Foundation, put together a comprehensive analysis on the matter. Nearly 30 million people visit the dentist and when people have fears about doing so, this information may help to allay this phobia in some situations.

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Why Did the Turtle Go to the Dentist?

When a sea turtle in Florida was suffering from a cracked shell, a dentist came to her rescue.

Using an acrylic resin denture adhesive, Dr. Fred Troxel was able to bond two metal plates over the 10-inch split. The Florida Keys Turtle Hospital has been caring for the 40-pound turtle, fixing injuries that are believed to have been caused when she was struck by a boat.

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Mountain Dew Causing Major Damage to Teeth in Appalachia

Appalachian people need to find a new drink of choice.

The number of people in the Appalachians that consume Mountain Dew is increasingly experiencing rotted teeth. Public health advocates are recommending that the people consume less Mountain Dew, which may not be easy considering it is the region’s favorite drink.

One proposed solution would be to impose some kind of limit of soda for food stamp purchases. Despite what many people in the soda industry claim, dentists are unanimous about the negative impact the acid and sugar from soda have on a person’s teeth.

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Tooth Sensor Reveals In-Depth Oral Activity

A research team recently wanted to learn more about what is constantly happening in a person’s mouth.

As a result, National Taiwan University researchers built a sensor that can be embedded in a tooth or attached to a tooth. The sensor is small enough to fit inside an artificial tooth or it can straddle a real one.

With tiny wire located inside the sensor, the sensor has the ability to provide data to a computer. The research team claims that wireless sensors will be created in the future thanks to Bluetooth.

The sensor was unveiled at the International Symposium on Wearable Computers in Switzerland.

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