Today's Dental News

Massachusetts Looks for Varnish to Become More Widespread

Massachusetts officials want fluoride varnish to become more readily available. To do that, the requirements for who can apply for the cavity-protecting varnish can’t be as strict as they are now.

There is currently a small number of low-income children in Massachusetts who have access to this important fluoride varnish.

The new regulations would make it permissible for nonlicensed people who work under the supervision of a licensed dentist to apply the fluoride to someone’s teeth. The proposed rules were outlined at a meeting of the state’s Public Health Council, which is a committee that comprises doctors, professors and consumer advocates.

Despite the fact that a license won’t be required to perform these procedures, mandatory training would still be required.

Read more: Massachusetts Looks for Varnish to Become More Widespread

 

Plasma Brush Makes Impact on Dentistry

The plasma brush is capable of doing things never seen before.

This brush uses chemical reactions to disinfect and then clean fillings. The entire process takes less than 30 seconds.

The flame from the brush forms a unique bond for the cavity fillings with strength that may be unmatched. The chemical reactions from the brush alter the surface of the tooth for the better.

As of now, there have been no side effects from treatment with the plasma brush. There will be more trials to determine whether or not that stays true.

Read more: Plasma Brush Makes Impact on Dentistry

   

Taste Buds Don’t Necessarily Make People More Likely to Have Sweet Tooth

There’s no link between what one perceives as sweetness and what the person actually eats. In other words, it’s plausible that the more aware a person is to sweet tastes that the less sweet food he or she may eat.

The information was reported by a research team at Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia.

The goal of the study was to determine the level of sweets a person consumes based on how sensitive he or she is to sweets.

To gather the data, the research team studied 85 people and asked them the level of sweetness of a sucrose solution. The researchers then studied the dietary intake over several days.

Read more: Taste Buds Don’t Necessarily Make People More Likely to Have Sweet Tooth

   

Bacteria Utilizes Specific Methods to Combat Fluoride

Researchers have determined the tactics bacteria use to battle the impact of fluoride, which the bacteria come into contact with from toothpaste and mouthwash.

A Yale University research group explains it findings in the Dec. 22 issue of the online publication Science Express.

The researchers determined there are RNA messages named riboswitches that are capable of noticing buildup of fluoride, enabling the bacteria to utilize defense mechanisms. Some of the bacteria are associated with tooth decay.

The ability of fluoride to attach to teeth and protect the enamel is one of the reasons it has become so prevalent in toothpaste and mouthwash. It fights against acids that the bacteria generate.

Read more: Bacteria Utilizes Specific Methods to Combat Fluoride

   

Protocol Necessary to Decrease Bleeding After Some Dental Extractions

It’s essential for clinicians to have a protocol to lower the risk of bleeding after dental extractions in cardiac patients taking anticoagulant medications.

The Journal of Oral Implantology came to this conclusion in the current issue. The study indicated the use of leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin material, a material dentists use to promote healing and help tissue, is a safe filling.

The research team analyzed the impact of the biomaterial on 50 heart patients who had some type of oral anticoagulant therapy.

Read more: Protocol Necessary to Decrease Bleeding After Some Dental Extractions

   

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