Today's Dental News

Increasing Number of College-Aged Patients Have Major Dental Problems

The economic times continue to have a negative impact on oral health.

Many dental offices are being visited by college students that have big dental problems. This stems from the fact that many people don't have the dental coverage for regular dental visits.

Without the routine visits, the people see their dental health suffer in the long run. They also end up spending more money on dental care because the cost to fix the problems is more than the proactive care would have been.

Read more: Increasing Number of College-Aged Patients Have Major Dental Problems

 

Some Oral Bacteria May Cause Bowel Cancer

Maintaining solid oral hygiene could be a key to preventing bowel cancer.

A research team from the Dana-Farber Institute and the Broad Institute discovered a correlation between bacteria associated with gum disease and nine colorectal tumor samples. This indicates that there could be some kind of link.

Bowel cancer is one of the more common types of cancer. Only about half of the people who develop bowel cancer survive.

Read more: Some Oral Bacteria May Cause Bowel Cancer

   

Italian Woman Dies After Contracting Legionnaires’ Disease in Dental Office

An 82-year-old woman in Italy died after developing Legionnaires’ disease from the water at her dentist’s office.

The disease, which is a pneumonia-like illness, came from the bacteria in the dentist’s water line. This was determined to be the only possible cause for the woman to contract the disease because in the month the woman caught the disease, she had only left her house twice during what would have the incubation period. Both of the times she left her home were to visit the dentist.

The information comes from the journal The Lancet.

The usual sources that Legionnaires’ disease come from are air conditioning systems, hot water systems, spas and fountains. But a recent study indicated that Legionella bacteria can be found in dental water lines, which isn’t surprising since these bacteria are some of the more common bacteria found in water. Legionella pneumophila is the bacteria associated with the disease.

Read more: Italian Woman Dies After Contracting Legionnaires’ Disease in Dental Office

   

Smoking May Eliminate Helpful Bacteria

Smokers may be more vulnerable to diseases, in addition to developing diseases from smoking.

A new study explains that smoking forces the body to fight against helpful bacteria that serve to eliminate some harmful germs. The information appears in the journal Infection and Immunity.

The reason for this is based on the fact that the mouth of a nonsmoker contains an ecosystem of healthy bacteria. This type of ecosystem doesn't exist for nonsmokers, opening the possibility of being susceptible to some dangerous bacteria.

Read more: Smoking May Eliminate Helpful Bacteria

   

NYU School of Medicine Unveils Tobacco Treatment Toolkit

A new tobacco treatment toolkit was created to curb smoking.

The Manhattan Tobacco Cessation Program at the New York University School of Medicine released a kit, known as: Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: A Toolkit for Dental Providers. The toolkit is currently being used at the NYU College of Dentistry's teaching clinics. It will be given to dental professionals throughout the state of New York and around the country.

Statistics indicate that tobacco users who are given advice about quitting by a clinician are twice as likely to quit when compared to people who don't consult a clinician.

Read more: NYU School of Medicine Unveils Tobacco Treatment Toolkit

   

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