Today's Dental News

Dental X-Rays May Project Bone Fractures

Dentistry may aid in predicting who’s at risk of fractures.

By using dental x-rays, it’s now possible to tell who may be more susceptible to fractures, according to the journal Nature Reviews Endocrinology. The information was developed by researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy in Sweden.

After earlier research by this group, it was determined that there’s a correlation between sparse bone structure in the trabecular bone in the lower jaw and a higher likelihood of having had some bone fracture at some point in the past.

Read more: Dental X-Rays May Project Bone Fractures

No comments
 

Irish Teenagers Suffer from High Rates of Tooth Decay

Tooth decay is a major problem for teenagers in Ireland.

Recent information indicates that the tooth decay for teenagers there ranks among the highest in Europe. This is a major problem based on the fact that teenagers have double the chance of developing permanent decay in Ireland when compared to other countries.

The problem is compounded for teenagers in low-income areas, whereas teenagers in more affluent locations visit their dentists more often.

Read more: Irish Teenagers Suffer from High Rates of Tooth Decay

No comments
   

Some Floridians Don’t Receive Necessary Dental Care

Many residents in parts of Florida don’t get proper dental care.

This is a problem in Alachua County, even though the county has about 33 percent more dentists than the state average. The problem is only 20 percent of low-income residents received some kind of dental care in 2010. Comparatively, one-third of Floridians had some kind of dental care.

A particular aspect to be concerned with is the lack of dental care for children in the area. Even with the fluoridation and education about oral health, the problem involving getting dental care for children hasn’t improved much over past few decades.

Read more: Some Floridians Don’t Receive Necessary Dental Care

No comments
   

Dental Cells May Help Aid Spinal Injuries

Teeth may be the solution to spinal cord injuries.

Scientists concluded that teeth have the potential to repair broken spines at some point, thanks to a study that included stem cells and broken spines in rats.

The researchers were from Nagoya University in Japan. They infused dental stem cells into the spinal cord tissues of rats with broken backs. They discovered that dental pulp kept the cells alive. They also regenerated damaged nerves, allowing new cells to grow and aid the spinal cord.

Read more: Dental Cells May Help Aid Spinal Injuries

No comments
   

Some Los Angeles Dentists Won’t Treat HIV Patients

One out of 20 Los Angeles-area dentists won’t treat a patient with HIV or AIDS, according to a new study.

The study was compiled by the Williams Institute at the University of Los Angeles, California. Among the 612 dental offices polled, roughly 5 percent indicated they would not treat patients living with HIV.

This study was released because December 1 is World AIDS Day.

The answer most dentists provided for not treating HIV patients is that the surgery was not fully capable of managing the virus. Still, about 90 percent of dentists in the Los Angeles-area were open to treating HIV patients and 5 percent required special requirements for HIV patients.

Read more: Some Los Angeles Dentists Won’t Treat HIV Patients

No comments
   

Page 81 of 156