Green Tea May Lower Cancer Risk

Green tea may have even more benefits than originally thought.

A new study indicates that green tea may reduce the risk of throat cancer, in addition to colon and stomach cancer, for women. The information comes from a Canadian study in which 69,000 Chinese women were analyzed for a decade.

The study showed that the participants who drank green tea at least three times per week were roughly 14 percent less likely to develop stomach, colon or throat cancer.

The Vanderbilt University School of Medicine study definitively shows the tea consumption dropped the risk of cancer in the digestive system, according to the study's author, Wei Zhing.

Prior studies on green tea showed that green tea may have reduced the risk of cancer, but there was nothing definitive to suggest that. This study, however, took many factors—including lifestyle—into account and all signs pointed to green tea lowering the risk of cancer.

The results showed that women who consumed green tea for more than 20 years were about 27 percent less likely to develop cancer of the digestive system and they were 29 percent less likely to develop colorectal cancer when compared to women that did not drink green tea.
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