Today's Dental News

Periodontal Disease Associated with Risk of Kidney Disease

A recent study showed that periodontal disease will make someone more prone to kidney disease.

Among different races, the study showed that African Americans with normal kidney function were four times as likely to develop chronic kidney disease when compared to those without severe periodontal disease. The information will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2014.

Periodontal disease is a chronic bacterial infection of the oral cavity and disproportionately impacts people considered African American. It also has been pinpointed as a risk factor for CKD.

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Study Claims Most Dentist Discuss Tobacco Use With Patients

Dentists could play a pivotal role in curbing tobacco use.

A recent study was conducted regarding how much dentists know about their patients’ tobacco use and what they do to prevent it.

The results showed that 90 percent of dental providers stated that they asked their patients about their tobacco use on a regular basis. The numbers also stated that 76 percent counsel their patients while 45 percent offer tobacco cessation assistance.

Looking further into the numbers, when a practice has at least one hygienist, cessation assistance was often associated with the practice. Other factors that resulted in cessation assistance

Read more: Study Claims Most Dentist Discuss Tobacco Use With Patients

   

Saliva Test May Uncover Deadly Diseases

A revolutionary saliva test may be on the way.

UCLA researchers are working on a test that could have the ability to diagnose diseases like diabetes and cancer. It’s also possible the test could diagnose neurological disorders and autoimmune diseases.

The study determines that saliva contains many disease-indicating molecules that appear in blood. This information appears on the Web site of Clinical Chemistry and will be in the January print edition.

This test looks promising for diagnosing Type 2 diabetes and gastric cancers, specifically. The researchers used genomics and bioinformatics to analyze 165 million genetic sequences.

Read more: Saliva Test May Uncover Deadly Diseases

   

Gum Health May Have Gotten Worse as Time Passed

Ancient Romans knew how to take care of their gums.

Researchers from King’s College London determined that only 5 percent of Romans suffered from gum disease while 30 percent of people today encounter that problem. Based on archaeological studies, the researchers concluded that the Roman lifestyle led to much healthier gums.

The information appears in the British Dental Journal.

Dental issues, however, were still a problem during this time period. Abscesses and infections were quite common.

Today, smoking, type 2 diabetes and the food and drinks people consume lead to a higher risk of gum disease.

Read more: Gum Health May Have Gotten Worse as Time Passed

   

Some Countries Start to Place Greater Value on Oral Health

Supervised teeth brushing may happen at school in some places.

A supervising body in England and Wales recently detailed its new recommendations for healthcare and one of the policies included supervised brushing programs in school and nurseries. The goal is to lower the prevalence of decay among children.

Recent statistics indicate that 10 percent of 3-year-olds in England and Wales show signs of dental decay even though the condition could easily be prevented. In some places, more than half of 5-year-olds have decaying teeth. Dentists throughout the United Kingdom have reported more children than in the past need extensive procedures resulting from decaying teeth.

Read more: Some Countries Start to Place Greater Value on Oral Health

   

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