Today's Dental News

Coffee May Fight Gum Disease

Coffee may have an unintended benefit.

Researchers recently determined that drinking coffee could lower the risk of gum disease. A research team at Boston University’s Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine conducted the study. Their research indicated that coffee did not have a negative impact on periodontal health.

The study appeared in the August issue of the Journal of Periodontology.

The study also showed that drinking coffee regularly had a minimal impact on the number of teeth affected by bone loss.

To compile the data, a group of more of than 1,100 of adult males ages 26 to 84 were studied. This study was the first of its kind to explore the possible periodontal impact of drinking coffee.

Read more: Coffee May Fight Gum Disease

 

Red Wine may not be so Good for Oral Health

Red wine may be good for your overall health but not so much for you oral health.

The acidity of red wine leaves a mark on your teeth and over time that takes its toll. A survey released recently showed that only 16 percent of people are concerned with oral health implications when drinking alcohol. This is a problem based on the fact that many alcoholic drinks are filled with sugar and possess high acidity levels.

Acidic drinks attack enamel, making teeth more susceptible to bacteria. Sparkling wines or Champagne are the worst offenders of attacking teeth, which is why it’s better to drink a flat drink than a fizzy drink based on lesser carbonation.

Read more: Red Wine may not be so Good for Oral Health

   

Genetic Mutations Associated with Salivary Gland Tumors

A recent discovery could pave the way for better treatment of oral cancer.

The Scripps Research Institute found links involving a set of genes that promotes tumor growth and mucoepidermoid carcinoma, which is an oral cancer that impacts the salivary glands. This finding may lead to new treatment that could pinpoint the genetic causes of this type of cancer.

The information appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The researchers determined that a pair of proteins—known as CRTC1/MAML2—that are joined together by genetic mutation result in the growth and spread of oral cancer.

Read more: Genetic Mutations Associated with Salivary Gland Tumors

   

Anti-Pain Agent Reduces Oral Cancer, Leaves Healthy Tissue Unharmed

There may be a new way to treat oral cancer.

Mouse models of human oral cancer were treated with something called capsazepine, which simultaneously resulted in tumor shrinkage while sparing surrounding tissue. Researchers from the School of Dentistry and School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio conducted the study. The information appears in Oral Oncology.

Oral squamous cell carcinoma ranks eighth on the list of most common forms of cancer in the United States. There are roughly 40,000 new cases and 8,000 deaths each year.

Read more: Anti-Pain Agent Reduces Oral Cancer, Leaves Healthy Tissue Unharmed

   

Some Healthy Treats may be Harmful

Healthy treats may not be what they claim to be.

Many treats that profess to be healthy options to consider instead of sweets or chocolate may, in fact, contain excessive amount of sugar or high acidity levels. Some studies even show that raisins or cereal bars and drinks like smoothies or fruit juices can be as damaging to teeth as soda.

There are cases all the time of children who end up with some type of tooth decay even though the child’s parents took measures to prevent such a thing from happening.

The problems often stem from enamel damage caused by the food or drinks that prove to be unexpectedly high in sugar or acidity.

Read more: Some Healthy Treats may be Harmful

   

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